Most recent comments

  1. Yes, why dogs want to run and why they want to play is the same. When stimulated, for any reason, an animal is compelled to move. Movement reduces the mental pressure invoked by stimulation. But to go deeper into the nature of play, we then have to consider the mental process of objectification in terms of how an animal construct...
    Kevin Behan | over 1 year ago | Reply: Why Do Dogs Play?
  2. So is asking the question Why do dogs want to run? Ultimately not the same as - Why is play fun?
    Ben Draper | over 1 year ago | Reply: Why Do Dogs Play?
  3. The important thing to consider in discussions of domestication is that human beings are a part of nature as much as any wild animal. The basic code of animal consciousness is that the "negative-grants-access-to-the-positive." In other words, the predatory aspect of a being grants access to its preyful aspect, its body. So all an...
    Kevin Behan | over 1 year ago | Reply: Animal Domestication: Taming the Wild - Pictures, More From National Geograp...
  4. LOL
    Asif_Assassin | about 2 years ago | Reply: Why Do Dogs Play?
  5. Thanks for the link..........
    Asif_Assassin | about 2 years ago | Reply: Dogs Can Tell Happy or Angry Human Faces - Scientific American
  6. Here's a 2 minute video that really illustrates the "concentric rings" of bird language theory https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EYFsvow6-HY
    Willem | about 2 years ago | Reply: "Bird Language" and Constructal Law
  7. I also have been in the animal tracking and bird language path for close to 20 years and learning to read the signs of nature. I have recently found Kevin Behans work "your dog is your mirror" book and YouTube and podcasts, and it really touches me as an important part of this path. I have also read "design in nature" and find...
    Garth Olson | about 2 years ago | Reply: "Bird Language" and Constructal Law
  8. Interesting that the researcher acknowledges that she gave up a dog in the past and doesn't like to dwell on it and yet her study requires people to complete a 15-20 min survey....hmmm?! I wwonder if that doesn't skew the results in some way. But interesting
    joanne frame | about 2 years ago | Reply: Why Do People Sometimes Give Up Their Dogs? | Dog Spies, Scientific American...
  9. One way of stating the problem your dog is experiencing is that she has a high prey threshold by temperament, but she's been developed along a low prey threshold approach. So killing the mouse won't satisfy her temperament since she needs to take on the moose. This is the purpose of the big, heavy bite toy that you want her to ca...
    Kevin Behan | about 2 years ago | Reply: "Prey Fixation" on Other Dogs??
  10. I made a larger tug out of a jean leg to use for now until I can get a better one. I tugged with her a bit and then let her carry it around. She was shaking it like crazy and then kind of slouching over it and got very calm, acting very different than usual. She had never done this with her regular tug, with that she more pran...
    GSD | about 2 years ago | Reply: "Prey Fixation" on Other Dogs??
  11. Thanks for your advice and information. That's so interesting that you mention "hyper-friendliness to people", because that is exactly how she is. Way too friendly and interested in people and greeting visitors. She's the dog that will lick a robber to death rather than do anything. Heck, she doesn't even bark when people...
    GSD | about 2 years ago | Reply: "Prey Fixation" on Other Dogs??
  12. Yes what you are articulating is manic prey instinct "missile lock," a state of fixation indeed. The problem remains however that you must shift your dog into Prey Drive and get beyond prey instinct. Prey Drive could more accurately be called "The Drive-to-Make-Contact." (All behavior has a preyful aspect as its emotional ground,...
    Kevin Behan | about 2 years ago | Reply: "Prey Fixation" on Other Dogs??
  13. The basis of sociability is for the purpose of overcoming resistance. This is in fact how evolution happens. In order to overcome resistance individuals need to couple their efforts into a syncopated rhythm, I call this emotional coupling. All emotional phenomena are reflected in physical actions. When two individuals emotionall...
    Kevin Behan | over 2 years ago | Reply: Why do dogs lie or sit on our feet?
  14. I'm working on applying the Constructal Law to the animal mind and the Bristle Bot demonstration is closely related to this, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0uqsRGFLM20 Social behavior is simple, it's the base line, it isn't something that evolved from complex cognitive capabilities.
    Kevin Behan | over 2 years ago | Reply: Thousand-robot swarm assembles itself into shapes | Ars Technica
  15. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKCmhGbVd-o
    Sean | over 2 years ago | Reply: Thousand-robot swarm assembles itself into shapes | Ars Technica
  16. "There is something magical about seeing 1,000 robots move when humans are not operating any of them. And in a new study published in Science, researchers have created just that. This swarm of 1,000 robots can assemble themselves into complex shapes without the need for a central brain or a human controller."
    Sean | over 2 years ago | Reply: Thousand-robot swarm assembles itself into shapes | Ars Technica
  17. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8WxtuhiaJY
    Sean | over 2 years ago | Reply: Video of the Day: This Amazing Machine is Helping Feed Stray Dogs | Modern D...
  18. Here's the video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3j_gJ2teK5E
    Sean | over 2 years ago | Reply: Meet the electric life forms that live on pure energy - life - 16 July 2014...
  19. Why does my dog put his bury his head in my arms only in the morning ?
    | over 2 years ago | Reply: From the archives: why do dogs wag their tails?
  20. Why do dogs lie or sit on our feet? And why might a dog sit on a lying dog?
    4pawdrive | over 2 years ago | Reply: From the archives: why do dogs wag their tails?

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